Cryptomining | Stay Smart Online

Cryptocurrency mining (cryptomining) is legitimate and is a critical part of how cryptocurrencies work.

Cryptomining uses the processing power of computers to solve complex mathematical problems, and verify cybercurrency transactions. The miners—­­­­who are like auditors—are then rewarded with a small amount of cybercurrency.

This step ensures the validity of the currency, with no one able to use the same money twice. The miners keep cryptocurrency users honest!

The method to verify these transactions takes a lot of processing power and even when cryptominers use dedicated computers, they don’t usually earn very much.

To earn more, dodgy cryptominers use cryptomining malware to try and hack into people’s computers and use their computer’s processing power, often without them knowing.

Cryptocurrency mining (cryptomining) is legitimate and is a critical part of how cryptocurrencies work.

Cryptomining uses the processing power of computers to solve complex mathematical problems, and verify cybercurrency transactions. The miners—­­­­who are like auditors—are then rewarded with a small amount of cybercurrency.

This step ensures the validity of the currency, with no one able to use the same money twice. The miners keep cryptocurrency users honest!

The method to verify these transactions takes a lot of processing power and even when cryptominers use dedicated computers, they don’t usually earn very much.

To earn more, dodgy cryptominers use cryptomining malware to try and hack into people’s computers and use their computer’s processing power, often without them knowing.

Last year, word spread that popular yet dubious torrent site The Pirate Bay had embedded cryptocurrency mining software on its site, stirring up widespread controversy. If it wasn’t clear then, it is now: The Pirate Bay was exploiting its visitors by hijacking CPUs, or processors, to do the bookkeeping of cryptocurrency networks like those of Bitcoin and Ethereum.

If this sounds like shady practice, it is.

We are talking about The Pirate Bay (TPB) after all.

In its defense, all the organization had to add was that it was trying to earn revenues to make up for its gradual elimination of advertisements altogether. In effect, it’s a clever way to make money from the swaths of TPB users sporting ad-blocking extensions.

Unfortunately, ‘borrowing’ someone else’s computer to do your bidding is a devious strategy, even if it is a legal gray area.

By Michael Nadeau

Senior Editor,

CSO |

Cryptojacking is the unauthorized use of someone else’s computer to mine cryptocurrency. Hackers do this by either getting the victim to click on a malicious link in an email that loads cryptomining code on the computer, or by infecting a website or online ad with JavaScript code that auto-executes once loaded in the victim’s browser.

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Cryptocurrency mining (cryptomining) is legitimate and is a critical part of how cryptocurrencies work.

Cryptomining uses the processing power of computers to solve complex mathematical problems, and verify cybercurrency transactions. The miners—­­­­who are like auditors—are then rewarded with a small amount of cybercurrency.

This step ensures the validity of the currency, with no one able to use the same money twice. The miners keep cryptocurrency users honest!

The method to verify these transactions takes a lot of processing power and even when cryptominers use dedicated computers, they don’t usually earn very much.

To earn more, dodgy cryptominers use cryptomining malware to try and hack into people’s computers and use their computer’s processing power, often without them knowing.

Is your computer secretly being used for cryptomining? It’s staggering to realize that Bitcoin, the very first cryptocurrency, splashed onto the scene almost a decade ago.

Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for clever ways to turn new technology into money-making opportunities. Cryptojacking is one of their latest innovations

Cryptojacking is the unauthorized use of an individual or organization’s computer to secretly mine for cryptocurrency.

Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for clever ways to turn new technology into money-making opportunities.

The popularity of cryptocurrency, a form of digital currency, is rising. However, many people do not understand cryptocurrency and the risks associated with it. Malicious cyber actors use cryptocurrency-based malware campaigns to install cryptomining software that hijacks the processing power of victim devices and systems to earn cryptocurrency. There are steps users can take to protect their internet-connected systems and devices against this illicit activity.

Cryptocurrency is a digital currency used as a medium of exchange, similar to other currencies. Bitcoin, Litecoin, Monero, Ethereum, and Ripple are just a few types of the cryptocurrencies available.

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Cryptojacking is the hot new way for criminals to make money using your hardware. A website you have open in your browser can max out your CPU to mine cryptocurrency, and cryptojacking malware is becoming increasingly common.

Cryptojacking is an attack where the attacker runs cryptocurrency-mining software on your hardware without your permission. The attacker keeps the cryptocurrency and sells it for a profit, and you get stuck with high CPU usage and a hefty electricity bill.

While Bitcoin is the most widely known cryptocurrency, cryptojacking attacks usually involve mining other cryptocurrencies. Monero is particularly common, as it’s designed so people can mine it on average PCs.

Cryptojacking is a growing problem and it’s starting to become one of the biggest computer threats out there. With the current cryptocurrencies explosion, this new kind of profit-generating practice is quickly spreading.

While cryptomining is a completely legal way to earn cryptocurrencies, cryptojacking is another story.

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