What is cryptojacking? How to prevent, detect, and recover from it | CSO Online

As the value of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Monero skyrocketed last year, a more sinister trend came with it. Cybercriminals saw the opportunity to hijack unprotected computers to use their processing power to mine cryptocurrency – an activity that involves calculating extremely complex mathematical problems.

Those calculations require a lot of CPU resources and electricity, so hackers use browser mining scripts to illicitly using other people’s computers (called cryptojacking) so they can mine cryptocurrencies at no cost.

In this article, we’ll explain how you can protect your system from browser mining so it’s not used as a get-rich-quick vehicle for cybercriminals.

First, we need to understand the nature of cryptocurrencies. These digital currencies are based on cryptography (also referred to as hash algorithms) that record financial transactions.

Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for clever ways to turn new technology into money-making opportunities. Cryptojacking is one of their latest innovations

Cryptojacking is the unauthorized use of an individual or organization’s computer to secretly mine for cryptocurrency.

Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for clever ways to turn new technology into money-making opportunities.

The Pirate Bay, the world’s most popular torrent website, was recently spotted testing a Monero cryptocurrency miner on their websites. The website confessed that it could be using coin mining in future to keep the website running. This was followed by some other reports of similar nature.

This practice isn’t new, but the Pirate Bay was the first popular website that was seen using a cryptocurrency miner. This has also fueled the ethics debate as the website owners are found to be keeping the visitors in the dark.

However, I was surprised to notice that many users who commented on the article and Facebook didn’t mind their favorite website using their CPU power to earn revenue. This could be due to the fact that torrent websites are home to tons of notorious advertising.

by
Zohaib Khan

We are facing an challenge in our environment, there are multiple user from different vlan and workgroup use to connect with our network.

We have notice some of them using cryptocurrency mining.

We want to block
cryptocurrency mining 
on edge firewall.

We have sonic wall as our Edge Firewall.

Is there any way to block
cryptocurrency mining 
on sonicwall

We are facing an challenge in our environment, there are multiple user from different vlan and workgroup use to connect with our network.

We have notice some of them using cryptocurrency mining.

We want to block
cryptocurrency mining 
on edge firewall.

We have sonic wall as our Edge Firewall.

By Michael Nadeau

Senior Editor,

CSO |

Cryptojacking is the unauthorized use of someone else’s computer to mine cryptocurrency. Hackers do this by either getting the victim to click on a malicious link in an email that loads cryptomining code on the computer, or by infecting a website or online ad with JavaScript code that auto-executes once loaded in the victim’s browser.

[ How much does a cyber attack really cost? Take a look at the numbers. | Get the latest from CSO by signing up for our newsletters.

One reply on “What is cryptojacking? How to prevent, detect, and recover from it | CSO Online”

What is cryptojacking? How to prevent, detect, and recover from it | CSO Online

Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for clever ways to turn new technology into money-making opportunities. Cryptojacking is one of their latest innovations

Cryptojacking is the unauthorized use of an individual or organization’s computer to secretly mine for cryptocurrency.

Cybercriminals are always on the lookout for clever ways to turn new technology into money-making opportunities.

By Michael Nadeau

Senior Editor,

CSO |

Cryptojacking is the unauthorized use of someone else’s computer to mine cryptocurrency. Hackers do this by either getting the victim to click on a malicious link in an email that loads cryptomining code on the computer, or by infecting a website or online ad with JavaScript code that auto-executes once loaded in the victim’s browser.

[ How much does a cyber attack really cost? Take a look at the numbers. | Get the latest from CSO by signing up for our newsletters.

By Maria Korolov

Contributing Writer,

CSO |

Hackers are turning to cryptojacking — infecting enterprise infrastructure with crypto mining software — to have a steady, reliable, ongoing revenue stream. As a result, they’re getting very clever in hiding their malware.

[ Learn how new cryptocurrencies offer better anonymity, new security challenges.

| Sign up for CSO newsletters.

]

Enterprises are very much on the lookout for any signs of critical data being stolen or encrypted in a ransomware attack. Cryptojacking is stealthier, and it can be hard for companies to detect.

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Criminals are using ransomware-like tactics and poisoned websites to get your employees’ computers to mine cryptocurrencies. Here’s what you can do to stop it.

Cryptojacking is the unauthorized use of someone else’s computer to mine cryptocurrency. Hackers do this by either getting the victim to click on a malicious link in an email that loads cryptomining code on the computer, or by infecting a website or online ad with JavaScript code that auto-executes once loaded in the victim’s browser.

Either way, the cryptomining code then works in the background as unsuspecting victims use their computers normally.

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security

If 2017 was the year of the ransomware attack, then 2018, insofar as it can be defined by malware, was the year of cryptojacking.

In early 2018, the cryptocurrency market hit unprecedented levels, leading to a boom in cryptocurrency mining, both legal and illicit.

As the value of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Monero skyrocketed last year, a more sinister trend came with it. Cybercriminals saw the opportunity to hijack unprotected computers to use their processing power to mine cryptocurrency – an activity that involves calculating extremely complex mathematical problems.

Those calculations require a lot of CPU resources and electricity, so hackers use browser mining scripts to illicitly using other people’s computers (called cryptojacking) so they can mine cryptocurrencies at no cost.

In this article, we’ll explain how you can protect your system from browser mining so it’s not used as a get-rich-quick vehicle for cybercriminals.

First, we need to understand the nature of cryptocurrencies. These digital currencies are based on cryptography (also referred to as hash algorithms) that record financial transactions.

Some websites may use your computer to mine cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and Monero. Here’s how to stop them.

Mining cryptocurrencies is a great way to earn small amounts of residual income (that could possibly be worth much more in the future).

One reply on “What is cryptojacking? How to prevent, detect, and recover from it | CSO Online”